The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning 2006

On one last road trip before they're sent to serve in Vietnam, two brothers and their girlfriends get into an accident that calls their local sheriff to the scene. Thus begins a terrifying experience where the teens are taken to a secluded house of horrors, where a young, would-be killer is being nurtured...

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really starting 2 like my scary films recently gonna try this as ive only seen the new 1
Today I seen the trailor for this movie and I must saw it looks promising. I'm not a fan or re-makes or sequils/prequils. These usually wreck a perfectly good movie but in some instances adds to or makes better the previous...but very rarely though.

The Texas Chainsaw MAssacure:The Beginning, offers a brilliant cast with up and coming actors and actresses. Jordana Brewster has proven to be very versatile in her roles. The one that shocked me the most was her 2004 hit, D.E.B.S. Where she played Lucy Diamond. But i'll do a critique on this one later.

Leather face returns to the screen once again in this thriller suspense film that promises to deliever teeth chattering, on the edge of your seat excitement. In some instances a trailor rarely does a movie justice, as well as sometime the trailor is better then the movie. But i'll jus have to wait untill it comes out to serve up an appropriate review. The movie is set to release October 4, 2006.
Okay, I'm just calling this movie "The Beginning"... I don't do the full title deal.

Either way, I saw this film not expecting to like it, because the first remake was nowhere near the original.

This one comes closer.

Of course it doesn't surpass it, but it doesn't fall short either.

What it does is pile on so much gore, suspense, and violence that I was worried it wouldn't even get an R rating, rather the lesser known NC-17.

The film is also stronger being set ten years earlier during the Vietnam war where violence and death were a way of everyday life.

The "kids" were the strongest group of actors and characters out of ANY of the films, including the original.

Solid showing.

**1/2
Special Guest Review! Leatherface speaks

When I was first asked to do a review of the new film The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, I was a little reticent. First of all, I'm not really much for true-life stories, except for Alive and Lady Sings the Blues (Diana Ross is amazing!) so the thought of seeing my own just brought back too many memories of Amy Fisher TV-movies. I was also a little insulted--the only one with the idea to have me give an honest opinion about something based on my own life was some lowgrade blog? Where's Details? Where's The New Yorker? Where's Interview? Have I become that much of a joke to popular culture? Apparently so.

The film begins with my birth, depicted, as I'm told it happened, in a slaughterhouse. Now I was there at the time, but I don't remember it happening exactly like this, though the woman who plays my mother does look an awful lot like the pictures of her in the family room. The problem is that you never find out what happens to her--she gives birth and promptly vanishes from the picture. When it cuts to a couple decases later, where you see me working in the slaughterhouse, I'm living with my "aunt" and "uncle" and brother with no mention of mom. The film completely skims over her horrific battle with pancreatic cancer, which may have gotten better had we bothered to leave the house.

Years later, I'm working at the slaughterhouse where I was born, which is really the ultimate in "where is my life going" scenarios. The film simply depicts me as going nuts when they close the place down, causing me to kill the slaughterhouse's two employees, but it seems completely random and doesn't explore what was going on in my head at the time. The truth is that that's the moment I had an epiphany, finally finding some goal in my otherwise-aimless life.

You see, I'm not an attractive man. Oh, sure, my friends say I look okay, and when I look in the mirror and have enough time to prep, I've got to say I'm not bad, but when I see a picture of myself, I'm all like, "who the hell is that guy with the red face and the drooping flesh and the sunken eyes?" That, coupled with the fact that I can't talk because my tongue looks like a bloody hunk of bad origami always caused me to have issues with my self-esteem.

It was that moment when Ed came up to me to let me know about the closing and told me called me a freak that I finally realized how I could use meat to my advantage. I would become a master of slaughterhouse fashion, using the folds of flesh to create myself a new look, a new style, a new person, someone with a distinctive personality you could see when he walked in the room. I'd spent many of my teen years lying in bed with bacon strapped to my face with rubber bands as I listened to my Lesley Gore albums, gently sobbing to myself, so it was really the culmination of everything that was me coming to the forefront. I got so excited that I saw his pasty, unshaven skin and just had to kill him.

The Texas Chainsaw Masscre: The Beginning completely eschews any motivation for my actions or the actions of my family, instead focusing on a bunch of teenagers (including D.E.B.S.' Jordana Brewster) who are on their way to an army base so one of them can re-enlist. They're not a bad bunch of kids, and the actors that play them are okay, but they get all the character development! Isn't this supposed to be my story?

Oh, sure, we find out where I got my fleshy face mask from, but we never learn why I got decided to get it. You see, I took it from Eric because Eric was a veteran, and my brother Hoyt (played expertly in the film by R. Lee Ermey) always seemed so proud of veterans. He's never been all that proud of me and what I wanted to do with my fashion career, dismissing it as "queer stuff,"* and I thought that if I had the face of of veteran, maybe he'd look at me and see that I was brave too. I'm sure Vietnam was bad and everything, but I had to go through a lot with my mom dying and me being hideously disfigured and all.

The film follows the group of four as they meet us, and we do what some conceive as terrible things to them, and it's all shot rather well, except for some of the action scenes, which are in that hand-held blurryvision that I don't like and make it hard to tell what's going on. It's not really all that graphic, and all was see are the aftereffects of my work (Hoyt gets some good licks in too) so it's not like you're seeing my design process at work.

At one point a really fat woman shows up for no reason and disappears in the next scene, and you might think this is my mom, but it isn't. She's just some lady Luda Mae had over for tea sometimes, and she's so boring. She doesn't kill anyone, she can barely get up, and she only talks about chocolate. I mean I like bonbons as much as the next guy, but come on! I hate when she comes over because I have to listen to her talk until I can find some reason to go out and chops the limbs off of someone. Still, I'd love to have some "alone time" with her, because she's got enough flesh on her for a whole show at fashion week! I know, I'm so bad.

The movie has it's fair share of problems, like the fact that seems almost squeamish, cutting away from the more violent moments, and that you can pretty much figure out when every shock moment is coming--just wait five seconds into the silence and something loud will happen. Plus it's not really "the beginning," as the family seems to have already resorted to cannibalism, there's already bodily remains in the garage, and you never find out what exactly is making us act this way. (I blame the meds!) Still, it's got a great ending that makes me look like the star I've always wanted to be.

Maybe it's just because it's my life depicted on screen that I didn't really care for The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, but I honestly don't think it's that good of a movie in the first place. It's better than the first remake, which was just stupid, but it's still too loud and flashy instead of being moody and sinister like the 1974 film, which used my presence sparingly but made me look awesomely fearsome whenever I did show up. I probably wouldn't mind seeing a film that really explored my own personal demons and why I do the things I do, though it might hit too close to home, and I've been reading Daniel Goleman's "Social Intelligence" lately to work it out myself anyway.

(BTW: Does anyone out there watch "Project Runway?" I'm totally rooting for Jeffrey, whose neck I would so wear as an ascot.)

* -- I know what you're thinking, and I get that a lot. But we've all done some experimenting, right? And when you've got all these dead bodies around, you're bound to try out some things. But like I told Hoyt, "I'm not gay, I don't know what I am, I'm just me." Of course with my tongue, it came out like "bwaaggh bagghh gwahhhh," but whatever.
Last night, I had the opportunity to catch a sneak preview screening of "Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning", and I thought it was one of the best horror flix I have seen in a long time! The backstory of Sheriff Hoyt's origin was a great twist I didn't expect. I also like how the movie wasn't a Leatherface bio pic, but instead, focused on the cannibalistic Hewitt clan as a whole. The original "Texas Chainsaw" is one of my favorite movies of all time. I wasn't that crazy about the 2003 remake, and wasn't too sure what to expect from the prequel. In the end though, this die hard TCM fan left the theatre more than pleased.
If you plan to see Texas Chainsaw Massacre:The Beginning let me tel you one thing.Make sure you prepare yourself for a level of fear that beats The Omen,The Grudge,and even The Exorcist.This movie brutally answers every question we've had about the classic horror movie icon Leatherface.The origin of leatherface will indeed leave you speechless,horrified, and disturbed.The kills are absolutely bloody,realistic and more hardcore than any existing slasher movie.I fell in love with Texas Chainsaw Massacre:The Beginning because it's one of the most shocking horrors i've seen in a very long time.Be prepared for a shock a minute,fast paced,intense,chiller that will leave you desperately trying not to vomit on the theatre seat in front of you.
I loved the original movie.It scared audiences around america. It is one of the best horror movies ever made. I also enjoyed the remake in 2003.The Beginning I must say I was not a fan of. I thought it was a stupid idea in the 1st place to make a prequal on the Texas Chainsaw Massacre,but this proved it was stupid. I just didnt like how they told everything. Like the birth of Thomas Hewitt was stupid, and I dont like how he was found. He should of actually been in the family. I also dont like how they show how Sheriff Hoyt becomes Sheriff Hoyt and how he lost his teeth, as well as there friend that lost his legs. I guess I just thought he lost them for other reasons. Not the dumb reason they had for this movie. Thomas Hewitt also known as Leatherface, also didnt feel like Leatherface. I felt like he was a WWE Wrestler. Another problem with this movie was the running time..it was 84 minutes long. Thats not good at all. A movie should be at least 100 minutes. But im glad it didnt run any longer, I got bored enough. The one good thing this movie had would be the gore. It was filled with gore and good death scenes. I do think they should of used the chainsaw more, I mean come on it is the Texas "Chainsaw" Massacre. I just thought this movie was really stupid, and unneeded. It also isnt scary at all, and is very predictible.
Bottom Line is that this movie sucked.
Stick with the Original and 2003 Remake!
It was not as good as it could have been but it was not bad.
:fresh: I nearly crapped my pants when I saw this - goriest movie I've ever seen!
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning can be described as maliciously bloodthirsty, torturously cruel, and white-knuckle thrilling. But somewhere along the way it also manages to be overwhelmingly repetitive and drastically familiar. While it's noticeably better than the 2003 remake regarding its thrills and raw violence, it still leaves a lot to be desired from such a notorious franchise and an even more iconic villain.....

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